Share the Trail

There's a saying: You'll never win a fight with an automobile. The same general rule applies to any situation in which you find yourself - the bigger object wins. On trails, a hiker is about the smallest, slowest object so it is in your best interest to yield to any other mode of transportation you encounter.


A commonly used trail sharing sign is shown here.
The rules are:
The concept is that bikers are fast and can stop and go easily so they let everything else have the right of way. Horses are big and unpredictable so they get the right of way.

As a slow, unprotected hiker, I'm not about to argue the right of way with a horse or biker or ATV or anything else I might meet. I will always politely yield the trail and use the time to take a deep breath and say 'Howdy'.

Here are a bunch of tips to make it easier to share the trail with others. Please remember these and try to follow them and pass them on to new hikers:

Trail User.s Safety Code

It is every trail users responsibility and right to ensure their own safety and expect safe practice from other trail users. Exercise caution at all times, follow guidelines and rules of the trails. Preventing accidents or injuries is the first step, acting responsibly if something does happen is the second. Always think and look ahead.

A Trail User's Code of Ethics

A Trail User's Guide for Environmental Awareness

A Trail User's Guide to Public Awareness

A Trail User's Guide to Campsite Etiquette

Be prepared for your safety

  • Always be alert and respectful of wildlife.
  • Expect Snow or Rain at any-time. Dress for significant weather changes. Wear good foot wear.
  • Carry plenty of water. Open sources of water may not be safe to drink without filters or treatment.
  • Use a headlamp or flashlight in tunnels.
  • Be aware of rockfalls, slides and washouts.
  • Be aware of communication limitations. Cellular telephone coverage may not be available.
  • BC Law requires cyclists to wear helmets at all times.
  • Use caution near rivers and creeks. Strong currents exist.